Postcode Lottery

I’ve always thought of myself as fortunate. Opportunities have landed in my path. My parents bought a house in the catchment area for a good school. My teachers saw to it that I got into a good university. That good education got me a job that I love. I have three beautiful children. My husband works hard so that I don’t have to choose between my career and spending time with my children. Childbirth aside, touch wood, I have never needed a night in hospital. I have not yet been reliant on benefits. We have been able to choose, get a mortgage for, and afford a deposit on, a perfect home in a stunning part of the world.

Benjamin looking contented, wearing a warm jacket in a SN buggy

Comfy in his new buggy

Now we have Benjamin, still, we are fortunate. The healthcare he receives is second-to-none. He gets all the therapy in the community that he needs. All the equipment that he requires is also provided (albeit a little slow to arrive at times). He attends a wonderful SEN nursery and will attend a wonderful SEN school. He has a dedicated pair of support workers who keep him safe (and give him many, many cuddles) whenever I am not with him. Social care-funded agency carers help us for six hours a week, Benjamin gets two nights a month in a specialist respite care unit, and we have the support of our children’s hospice whenever we need it. Benjamin gets disability living allowance, we have a car through Motability and a blue badge. Our house will soon be adapted to suit Benjamin’s needs and the local authority will fund 80% of the cheapest option as quoted by the cheapest supplier; moreover, the work will should be completed by the time we really need it! Yes, we had to fill out some forms and write some letters. Yes, we had to dig around to find out what we were entitled to and we had to fight a little to get some of that. Yes, once or twice I have had to write to my MP and the local paper. But, generally, we get what Benjamin needs and what we as a family need. We are indeed fortunate, or so I thought.

Benjy in his kitchen chair, with Caitlin sitting on his lap, her hand on his chest as if doing chest physio

Expert physio

Then, I started talking to other parents. Some families, in local authorities not too far away, get 12 hours nursing care a day. Some families get additional care in the school holidays. Some families received an automatic referral to psychological support to help them to deal with the trauma surrounding giving birth to a child with severe disabilities. Some families get twenty new syringes a day. Some families get liquid drugs so they don’t have to faff around crushing and grinding tablets to within an inch of their life to ensure they don’t block the feeding tube… I started to feel less fortunate. I started to feel jealous.

Then, I started talking to other parents. Some families’ only respite centre is being closed down. Some families have to self-fund essential equipment such as a suitable wheelchair. Some families can’t get a blue badge even though some days their child can’t get out of bed. Some families have to fight and fight and fight and go to court and pour every ounce of their energy and resources into fighting to get their child into a school that simply meets their needs. Some parents are forced to give up that battle, give up their career, and home-school their children. Some carers are carrying 50 kg children up and down stairs, or risking their backs lifting them into the bath because adaptations plans have stalled. Some families are crammed into a single room in a bed-and-breakfast because their local authority can’t find, won’t build, or refuse to adapt, a suitable property for their needs. Some children have seen half-a-dozen different paediatricians and never the same one twice. Some children have been discharged from all the services that might be able to help them. Some parents are accused of faking their child’s condition, or of poor parenting. Some are pushed so close to breaking point that they fear having their children taken away… Some families have their children taken away. I started to feel like the luckiest mother on earth. There, but for the grace of God, go I.

Why does it have to be like this?

Why do families at different ends of the same street, let alone different ends of the country, have to meet different criteria to get the same support? Why do families in very similar circumstances receive such vastly different levels of care (if any)? Why are we placed in these situations where we feel jealous, or guilty; where we have to compete? Why can’t there be a level playing field? Why isn’t access to support – health, education, social care, housing, advocacy – based on need and not on where you live, how deep you dig for information, how hard you’re prepared to fight, how well educated you are, who you know, who you can afford to employ, whether you are able to give up work, even whether you earn little enough to qualify for support (yes, it can work both ways)?

A circle of reusable nappies in a range of pastel shades

‘Why does it have to be like this?’ I asked Jenny Gilruth MSP at a recent round table discussion at the Scottish Parliament, Getting it Right for Parents of Children with Exceptional Healthcare Needs. She said I couldn’t expect everything to be centralised. But I’m not asking for provision to be centralised, I’m just asking for the rules, the criteria, the tick-boxes, the ‘decision making tools’ to be standardised. It could be as simple as saying ‘which area provides an example of good practice in terms of [insert essential service here]? Let’s employ their strategy across the board.’ How can it be so difficult to ensure, for example, that all children with continence needs should receive enough suitable continence products to meet their needs from the same age? Presently, some NHS boards provide pads from age three, others age five; some areas won’t supply pull-ups and others won’t supply cloth nappies; and some children get three pads per day while others get an unlimited supply. It should be as simple as every relevant organisation paying more than lip service to GIRFEC (Getting it Right for Every Child, in Scotland, or its English and Welsh equivalent Every Child Matters).

We might live at different ends of the country, but unlike some politicians, policymakers and bureaucrats, SEN parents do talk to each other. We know there are discrepancies, huge discrepancies. We share as much knowledge and as many tricks as we can to help each other out, to level the hideously uneven playing field we find ourselves on. We try to get around the borders that divide us and to fight as a team, while the system tries to make us compete to be the loudest voice clamouring for limited funding and limited support. We know it’s a postcode lottery, and we know it’s all our children that are losing out.

Lottery tickets, a pen, Euro notes and coins

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6 thoughts on “Postcode Lottery

  1. This rings so true. We are in a very similar fortunate position but I will never understand why it all depends on where you live. After all your child’s needs wouldn’t change if you moved location but the support would. On the other hand having been in the Australian system for the first 3 years of my child’s life I can say we have it a million times better in the uk!

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  2. Tricky one this. I guess there’s only so much money to go round, and some of those parents you mentioned in your middle section (12 hours care a day?!) would have to give up what they have in order to help others less fortunate because of that postcode lottery. Of course, they’re unlikely to be keen to do that… plus, maybe they think they still aren’t getting enough care?! It’d be great if the slate could be wiped clean and we started out again with a level playing field, but I sadly can’t see that happening. Someone somewhere still needs to make all those difficult decisions about who gets what. I wish I had a magic wand to give everyone what they need 😦

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    • Clean slate would be great wouldn’t it 😁. But even without that, we could at least do with regulations stating some kind of minimum that has to be provided? Wouldn’t that make the decisions easier for the decision makers too?

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  3. I agree it is ridiculous and why shouldn’t it be equal based on need and not area where you live. But then I guess some areas may be poorer so perhaps they feel they need to readdress the balance and help them out more in these areas? Chances are though it has nothing to do with it at all.

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    • My anecdotal evidence suggests there’s no pattern at all! And it’s not all necessary financial either, I’m sure the places where parents are forced to more tribunals end up spending more… X

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  4. It all seems just so erratic doesn’t it!? And I think you are right, there really needs to be a better sort of national/centralised code to work to, and even some ring fenced central government funding, as not all local authorities have the same income yet children and families should be able to access the right equipment and support wherever they are!
    Thank you so much for joining #accesslinky

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