Trailblazing

So, I realise I bang on about inclusion rather a lot. That makes me both a zealot, and a hypocrite, because my son attends a specialist provision rather than the local primary school that his sisters go to. There are several reasons Benjamin still attends the wonderful, well-equipped, superbly-staffed specialist provision at which he started … Continue reading Trailblazing

Ignorance is bliss?

On the day that our lives were turned upside-down by an emergency 38-week scan, I remember begging the neurologist to put us in touch with other families with children like our as-yet unborn child. Some part of me knew – despite the medical predictions ("Your baby will never walk, or talk. He won’t be able … Continue reading Ignorance is bliss?

Graduation Day

Since when did nursery graduations become a thing? I'm sure I never had one, but last year my eldest daughter had two, complete with ribbon-tied certificates, gowns, mortar boards (long relegated to the bottom of the dressing-up box), and the obligatory cake. Lovely as they were, I couldn't help thinking this was all a little … Continue reading Graduation Day

Postcode Lottery

I’ve always thought of myself as fortunate. Opportunities have landed in my path. My parents bought a house in the catchment area for a good school. My teachers saw to it that I got into a good university. That good education got me a job that I love. I have three beautiful children. My husband … Continue reading Postcode Lottery

What a difference a drug makes

I’ve often joked that Benjamin is my easiest child. At least, alongside a five-year-old who will burst into tears if you suggest she watches CBeebies instead of Youtube (or, God forbid, actually turn the TV off), and a one-year-old who will literally climb the furniture to get at anything she shouldn’t have. He doesn’t answer … Continue reading What a difference a drug makes

Five things I’d change

This post was written for the #SEND30daychallenge, day 7: ‘Five things you’d change.’ We are so fortunate to live in Scotland, where there are really very few things that need to be changed so that Benjamin, and children like him, can live a safe, healthy, and happy life for as long as their biology and … Continue reading Five things I’d change