When life just carries on as normal

If you’re a parent, you’ll likely remember the feeling (how could you ever forget?) of emerging, blinking, into the light. Maybe from the hospital doorway; maybe your own front door. Maybe the very same day that precious bundle made its dramatic entry into the world; maybe one, two, or many, many days later. And… nobody notices. Everyone is rushing past on their way to work or wherever. Heads down. Headphones on. Grim faces. As they do every day. How can they? How can they just carry on as normal, as if nothing has happened. When the world is so changed? When for you, everything has changed.

If you’re not a parent, perhaps you felt it the morning after you first slept with the love of your life. Why can’t the world see I’m different? That nothing will ever be the same again.

The emotion is akin to that (and this is my poorest analogy, but I am an unashamed academic) I felt as a student when I’d been up all night writing the best essay of my life (only to have it shot down in a tutorial a few days later!). Tired but exhilarated. The world seems shifted: clearer, fresher, better resolved. In part delirium, in part clarity of thought, both probably born of exhaustion more than anything else.

It’s that feeling I get when I’ve been up all night saving a life.

His sats are dropping. I never believe the sats monitor but these are really dropping. He’s going blue. Literally choking on his own secretions. There’s no time to shout for help (and the last thing you want is to wake his sisters to see him like this; to see you, like this). There’s no time to call an ambulance, nothing like enough time. There’s no-one else. Just me, naked, a suction machine and a thin catheter. Catheter after catheter. Cursing the packets as I fumble them open. Cursing my shaking hands as I follow the tortuous path from his nose down towards his lungs. Holding my own breath until finally he can breathe again. Holding him close until his colour returns to normal. Kissing his forehead until, shivering with cold and fear, I creep back under the duvet, holding my sleeping husband for reassurance, holding the video-monitor next to my face.

I realise paramedics do this all the time. And nurses. Firefighters; lifeboatmen; midwives. I guess maybe they get used to it? Maybe it’s different when it’s your own child?

I am lucky. I have had to save his life maybe ten, maybe a dozen times only. Some mothers I know daren’t sleep unless there is an overnight carer with their child, maybe not even then. They lie with an oxygen bag and mask in their hands, ready to breathe for their child who may stop breathing several times a night.

And in the morning, I get up (or stay up). What else is there to do? There’s no time for self-indulgence, I’ve a family to run. Make a strong coffee, have a shower. Walk the girls to school. Hang out the washing. Busyness is good; I don’t want to sit and think.

I rarely tell anyone. “Did you sleep well dear?” “Not great…” How do you start a conversation with “I saved a life last night”?

And the feeling passes. Dwindles. Fades. Everything in my life returns to normal too. At least it has every time so far. Until the day I fail. One day I will fail and then nothing will ever be normal again.

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It ain’t easy being green

So, this week I got into an argument with some people I don’t know on Facebook (I know, I know, I should know better). The argument was about this picture, originally seen in a viral tweet:

Screenshot of a tweet showning an image of peeled oranges inside plastic cartons

A friend shared the photo with the single strapline ‘wtf’ and there followed several comments along the lines of ‘carry a pocket knife … no excuse for this.’

So I made the mistake of pointing out that some people, actually, do have an excuse, nay, a reason, to need such items, for instance poor coordination or muscular weakness, and that perhaps we could be open-minded enough to consider the difference such pre-prepared foods make to the potential for living an independent life as a person with a disability (as had already been adeptly pointed out on several news outlets such as The Metro). Sadly, few other commenters were interested in being open-minded, they only wanted to show off their green credentials by ramming the point about plastics home.

Similar arguments have been raging recently over the phasing out of disposable plastic straws, for which neither paper, stainless steel, or reusable plastic as yet provide a perfect alternative for those who cannot easily drink from a cup, can, or bottle. Now I do agree – who couldn’t, having seen the evidence on Blue Planet 2? – that, for reasons ranging from climate change to marine conservation to the depletion of resources, we need to reduce massively our reliance on plastic. In fact, living less than a mile from one of Scotland’s most beautiful (albeit inaccessible to wheelchairs) beaches, I am acutely aware of the despoiling nature of drinking straws, cotton buds, discarded flip-flops, etc., etc.

A beach covered in plastic trash

But. For some members of society there’s not ‘no excuse’ for using plastic drinking straws. They can’t just ‘carry a pocket knife’ and peel their own oranges. And vilifying these people doesn’t help build a compassionate society that shows concern both for our neighbours and for the environment we all share.

I try to be green. I walk or cycle where possible. I compost waste and use cloth nappies. We have insulated our house and don’t heat the rooms we don’t use. It’s in our own best interests: I know that working towards a more sustainable way of life is of most benefit to the most vulnerable, with eco-catastrophes such as more frequent and severe winter storms, rising fuel and food prices, and the loss of cultivable and habitable land, impacting hardest on disadvantaged groups including those with disabilities.

A pile of enteral syringes, of varying sizes

But, I also know that, because of Benjamin, our life is less sustainable than I would like. We have the (gas-fired) central heating on at night to keep him warm. We use – and discard – plastic containers, tubes, and packages every day as part of the process of feeding him safely. We have to drive places because public transport is not always feasible. Should we be mocked on social media for this? Should we be criticised for consuming materials that, literally, keep our son alive? Should being green trump caring for our most vulnerable?

Perhaps what is needed is legislation, not to outlaw single-use plastics entirely, but to limit them to those that cannot do without them. Of course, this will eventually make them effectively unavailable even to those that do need them, because a specialist label almost always means a specialist price-tag: the more ‘niche’ a product becomes, the more prohibitive its cost. Perhaps instead plastic goods should be available only on prescription, like antibiotics, to prevent irresponsible users putting everyone at risk. But with some clinical commissioning groups already considering cutting funding for non-pharmaceutical items such as prescription formula, I’m not sure this would be popular either.

There’s no easy answer. Clearly we should seek to develop safe, effective, reasonably-priced, sustainable alternatives to single-use plastics. But we aren’t there yet, and in the meantime I’m not sure banning them and stigmatising their users is the way forward. People with disabilities are discriminated against and misunderstood already; this will just provide the bullies and perpetrators of hate-crime with another weapon in their armoury.

So how can we reduce our plastic use without an outright ban that negatively impacts upon the small sector of society that truly can’t live without them? The first step has to be education: let’s keep up the impetus that Blue Planet 2 has started. At the same time, we need to support the development of safe, effective, affordable, desirable, and sustainable alternatives. In the meantime, it’s up to us all to be responsible: if you don’t depend upon plastics, don’t use them: leave them for those that do (I only hope people’s attitude to plastics differs from their attitude to disabled parking bays…!). With tolerance, thoughtfulness, and responsibility we could build a society that values its environment and its most vulnerable members. Is that too much to ask?

Benjamin, a smiling four-year old boy wearing glasses

These specs aren’t single-use plastic are they mum?

Postcode Lottery

I’ve always thought of myself as fortunate. Opportunities have landed in my path. My parents bought a house in the catchment area for a good school. My teachers saw to it that I got into a good university. That good education got me a job that I love. I have three beautiful children. My husband works hard so that I don’t have to choose between my career and spending time with my children. Childbirth aside, touch wood, I have never needed a night in hospital. I have not yet been reliant on benefits. We have been able to choose, get a mortgage for, and afford a deposit on, a perfect home in a stunning part of the world.

Benjamin looking contented, wearing a warm jacket in a SN buggy

Comfy in his new buggy

Now we have Benjamin, still, we are fortunate. The healthcare he receives is second-to-none. He gets all the therapy in the community that he needs. All the equipment that he requires is also provided (albeit a little slow to arrive at times). He attends a wonderful SEN nursery and will attend a wonderful SEN school. He has a dedicated pair of support workers who keep him safe (and give him many, many cuddles) whenever I am not with him. Social care-funded agency carers help us for six hours a week, Benjamin gets two nights a month in a specialist respite care unit, and we have the support of our children’s hospice whenever we need it. Benjamin gets disability living allowance, we have a car through Motability and a blue badge. Our house will soon be adapted to suit Benjamin’s needs and the local authority will fund 80% of the cheapest option as quoted by the cheapest supplier; moreover, the work will should be completed by the time we really need it! Yes, we had to fill out some forms and write some letters. Yes, we had to dig around to find out what we were entitled to and we had to fight a little to get some of that. Yes, once or twice I have had to write to my MP and the local paper. But, generally, we get what Benjamin needs and what we as a family need. We are indeed fortunate, or so I thought.

Benjy in his kitchen chair, with Caitlin sitting on his lap, her hand on his chest as if doing chest physio

Expert physio

Then, I started talking to other parents. Some families, in local authorities not too far away, get 12 hours nursing care a day. Some families get additional care in the school holidays. Some families received an automatic referral to psychological support to help them to deal with the trauma surrounding giving birth to a child with severe disabilities. Some families get twenty new syringes a day. Some families get liquid drugs so they don’t have to faff around crushing and grinding tablets to within an inch of their life to ensure they don’t block the feeding tube… I started to feel less fortunate. I started to feel jealous.

Then, I started talking to other parents. Some families’ only respite centre is being closed down. Some families have to self-fund essential equipment such as a suitable wheelchair. Some families can’t get a blue badge even though some days their child can’t get out of bed. Some families have to fight and fight and fight and go to court and pour every ounce of their energy and resources into fighting to get their child into a school that simply meets their needs. Some parents are forced to give up that battle, give up their career, and home-school their children. Some carers are carrying 50 kg children up and down stairs, or risking their backs lifting them into the bath because adaptations plans have stalled. Some families are crammed into a single room in a bed-and-breakfast because their local authority can’t find, won’t build, or refuse to adapt, a suitable property for their needs. Some children have seen half-a-dozen different paediatricians and never the same one twice. Some children have been discharged from all the services that might be able to help them. Some parents are accused of faking their child’s condition, or of poor parenting. Some are pushed so close to breaking point that they fear having their children taken away… Some families have their children taken away. I started to feel like the luckiest mother on earth. There, but for the grace of God, go I.

Why does it have to be like this?

Why do families at different ends of the same street, let alone different ends of the country, have to meet different criteria to get the same support? Why do families in very similar circumstances receive such vastly different levels of care (if any)? Why are we placed in these situations where we feel jealous, or guilty; where we have to compete? Why can’t there be a level playing field? Why isn’t access to support – health, education, social care, housing, advocacy – based on need and not on where you live, how deep you dig for information, how hard you’re prepared to fight, how well educated you are, who you know, who you can afford to employ, whether you are able to give up work, even whether you earn little enough to qualify for support (yes, it can work both ways)?

A circle of reusable nappies in a range of pastel shades

‘Why does it have to be like this?’ I asked Jenny Gilruth MSP at a recent round table discussion at the Scottish Parliament, Getting it Right for Parents of Children with Exceptional Healthcare Needs. She said I couldn’t expect everything to be centralised. But I’m not asking for provision to be centralised, I’m just asking for the rules, the criteria, the tick-boxes, the ‘decision making tools’ to be standardised. It could be as simple as saying ‘which area provides an example of good practice in terms of [insert essential service here]? Let’s employ their strategy across the board.’ How can it be so difficult to ensure, for example, that all children with continence needs should receive enough suitable continence products to meet their needs from the same age? Presently, some NHS boards provide pads from age three, others age five; some areas won’t supply pull-ups and others won’t supply cloth nappies; and some children get three pads per day while others get an unlimited supply. It should be as simple as every relevant organisation paying more than lip service to GIRFEC (Getting it Right for Every Child, in Scotland, or its English and Welsh equivalent Every Child Matters).

We might live at different ends of the country, but unlike some politicians, policymakers and bureaucrats, SEN parents do talk to each other. We know there are discrepancies, huge discrepancies. We share as much knowledge and as many tricks as we can to help each other out, to level the hideously uneven playing field we find ourselves on. We try to get around the borders that divide us and to fight as a team, while the system tries to make us compete to be the loudest voice clamouring for limited funding and limited support. We know it’s a postcode lottery, and we know it’s all our children that are losing out.

Lottery tickets, a pen, Euro notes and coins

Just a cold

The males in our household have been stricken with a cold. My husband has adopted the standard attitude of shuffling around the house looking sheepish, occasionally being wracked by paroxysms of coughing that needlessly shake his entire body, and ostentatiously ironing handkerchiefs and boiling kettles for uncertain purpose. This in itself is pretty hard work for the females of the family (with the exception of the guinea pigs who seem remarkably unbothered by the whole thing).

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No preschool today

Benjy, however, takes it to another level. It usually begins with a sudden dramatic increase in secretions (i.e., snot). During his morning physio routine, a white froth starts pouring from his nose. He’ll need suctioning every half an hour, day and night, rather than twice a day.

He’ll be uncomfortable – as you or I would be – but he cannot tell me so. Instead, his muscles will tense, he’ll be stiff, hot, jumpy and irritable, making me fear a seizure. He won’t sleep, and neither will I.

After a couple of days the secretions will thicken and he’ll wake choking in the middle of the night. This is the scariest time, frantically suctioning a frightened boy to clear enough of his airway so that he can breathe. His heart rate rockets and so does mine. I try to remember that, despite all his complex requirements and specialist equipment, Benjamin is still just a little boy with a cold. I give ibuprofen and Calpol, drop Olbas oil on his pillow and place bowls of steaming water in his room.

Then the wheezing starts – ‘viral induced wheeze’ they call it. Although his secretions are clearing, his oxygen levels are dropping. So it’s sixteen puffs of his salbutamol inhaler a day – twelve at scheduled times and four to keep in reserve for that middle-of-the-night panic.

A week in, and when most of us would be starting to get over it, the rest of his system starts to respond. This is what would have put us in hospital last year but now we are (hopefully) equipped to deal with it at home. With Benjy – and this is typical of jejunum-fed children, I’m assured by our patient specialist gastrointestinal nurse on the phone – his output of stomach juices and bile increases dramatically. So dramatically that they can’t all drain out into a bile-bag, but end up being vomited out of his mouth and nose. Now I know all our kids are superheroes, but sometimes I really wish Benjy’s superpower wasn’t firing green slime out of his nostrils onto his poor unsuspecting support worker…

IMG_20171220_221317_051.jpgWith the vomiting comes an increased risk that Benjamin will aspirate his stomach contents into his lungs and cause a chest infection. Our amazing team of ‘rapid response’ specialist respiratory physios come to the house to assess him and take swabs for analysis. We embark on a cause of strong antibiotics in addition to the prophylactic antibiotics that he is on permanently through the winter, just in case. We put Benjy to sleep on his side (worse for his back, better for his lungs). I ‘sleep’ with the video-monitor inches from my face, ready to leap up when I hear him cough. I wonder how we’ll manage in the New Year when we move him to a downstairs room.

The antibiotics have their usual effect of (without going into too much detail here) producing nappies that require an entire change of clothes, several times a day. I resort to sitting him on an incontinence pad to save washing his chair, car seat, or buggy. And I double his daily dose of Imodium. But he goes 48 hrs between bile-vomits, which is an improvement. We feel safe to send him to our wonderful NHS respite centre for a couple of nights. I feel glad they will be dealing with the nappies. I keep my fingers crossed they don’t panic and send him to the hospital.

I don’t know how much it has cost the NHS to see Benjamin through one simple cold – providing us with a sats monitor, suction machine, catheters, nebulisers, inhalers, medications; giving us the expert assistance of doctors, pharmacists, nurses and physios. I know it’s cost our family about a fortnight’s sleep, two swimming lessons, one meeting about Changing Places toilets and a whole lot of Christmas shopping.

But for all of us, this is infinitely better than having Benjamin in hospital, splitting our family up and putting him at risk of catching all manner of other winter bugs. I’m proud of what we’ve achieved, and I’m grateful for the equipment and training we’ve been given and the trust that has been placed in us, to keep Benjamin safe at home. Team Benjamin has risen to the challenge, so far.

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On the mend

We are the 57%

A few days ago, in a fit of frustration, I churned out a quick post about parking. Exciting, huh? But to my surprise it’s received over 11,000 views and generated a whole lot more Twitter traffic than I’ve ever had before.

So, what gives? Even posts I’ve sponsored on Facebook rarely get more than a few hundred views. Of all the posts I’ve written – on the difficulties of being undiagnosed, on the amazing work of children’s hospices, on the sanctity of human life, even on the importance of properly accessible toilets (which are certainly more scarce and arguably more important than parking bays), it’s the one on parking that’s sparked the most interest. I’m not bragging; I’m gutted.

So, what gives? Sure, in the UK we love our cars. We talk about the traffic almost as much as we talk about the weather. Victoria Coren Mitchell, presenter of Radio 4’s Women Talking About Cars, said the other day that for women, especially, cars represent a very special combination of both freedom and safety. For people with disabilities, cars probably mean even more in both those respects. Having only had one for six months, I love my Benjamin’s car, although I wish we didn’t have to use it so much. But I certainly don’t love parking – once I’ve got within a yard or two of the kerb I just want to shut the door and forget about it.

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If this was a disabled parking bay I guess I’d be tempted to park in it too…

So, what gives? Sure, in the UK we hate being told what to do – whether by a traffic warden, or Brussels, or a yellow line on the road and a blue badge in the window. But does that fully explain why I struck such a chord (or hit such a nerve, depending on your side of the debate) with a post about parking?

My theory is, it’s because parking is one of the few everyday battle lines between the disabled and the able. In fact, it’s one of the few situations in which disabled people are actually visible in our society. Yes, the able can complain about those of us ‘scrounging’ benefits. They can complain about us giving birth to children who will be nothing but a drain on society. They can complain about the effect inclusion has on the educational achievement of their mainstream children (hint: bugger all, apart from possibly making them less judgemental than their parents). But unless you actually know a person with a disability, you are unlikely to come up against these issues every day. Yet even if you don’t know a person with a disability, you probably park in a supermarket, school or public car park on a fairly regular basis.

And that’s the root of the problem really, isn’t it. Many people simply don’t know a person with a disability – or don’t realise they do. The Disabled Children’s Partnership, a coalition of charities campaigning to improve support for disabled children, young people and families, last week launched a new campaign called The Secret Life of Us. The aim of the campaign is to change the fact that an amazing 43% of the British public don’t know anyone who is disabled.

In parking, the 57% of us who have a disability, care for someone with a disability, or know someone with a disability, come directly up against the 43% who, through no fault of their own, don’t think they know anyone with a disability. The former know all too well the need for disabled bays, and cannot understand why anyone else would park in such spaces when they are so clearly needed. The latter cannot see the need for disabled bays, consider them an unearned privilege – particularly if we are not in a wheelchair, do not look disabled, or have children that are small enough to lift – and don’t see why they shouldn’t use them when it suits them.

So maybe this is where we should start. At the battle line. At one of the few places where the 57% become visible to the 43%. Disabled parking spaces are all about accessibility. Without accessibility it is very hard to have inclusion. Without inclusion it’s impossible to have integration. Without integration, it is extremely difficult to foster understanding. And without understanding, well why the hell shouldn’t I use that disabled parking space to save me a couple of minutes of my valuable time as a contributing member of society popping into the shop to get a pint of milk? It’s a vicious circle.

The Secret Life of Us campaign aims to break that circle, to help us – the 43% and the 57% – get to know one another. Now, the 43% can’t do anything about this – they don’t know we exist, remember. Their hands are tied. It’s up to us, the 57%, to start building awareness, to be brave and not shy away from sharing our stories and showing our lives in all their flaws and their beauty. Because everyone’s life – disabled or not – has flaws and it has beauty.

If you read my blog (thank you!) you’ll have a glimpse of that: stressful, sometimes traumatic, hard work, rewarding, ever-changing and featuring rather a lot of bodily fluids… But there’s a lot more I can do. Everyone in my community knows Benjamin, but not everyone in my community knows that I had anorexia in my twenties. I’m in awe of friends who are becoming more open about their mental health – in person and on social media. Social media certainly has a role to play here: the ease with which we can share The Secret Lives of Us – anonymously if we wish to – makes now an ideal time to bridge the gap between the 57% and the 43%.

I’m not saying we all need to go around shouting about our bowel movements and breakdowns and whether we’ve had breakfast all day long… but if the 57% can share a little more and the 43% can listen a little more, maybe we can all judge a little less. Because parking shouldn’t be a battle line. There shouldn’t be any everyday battle lines. ‘The disabled population is the world’s largest minority of which anyone can become a part at any time.’ We are the 57% – and one day you might be too.

If you would like to be involved in the Disabled Children’s Partnership, you can sign up at http://e-activist.com/ea-action/action?ea.client.id=78&ea.campaign.id=71897, follow it on Facebook and on Twitter. Share your stories, and read others, using the hashtag #SecretLifeofUs

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I’ll let you into a secret: sometimes our life is a bit dull #SecretLifeofUs

This is a disabled parking bay…

This is a disabled parking bay. There are four of them at my son’s school. They are close to the school entrance and they are wider than normal bays. Doesn’t it look inviting?

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This is my son Benjamin’s blue badge. I had to apply for it, and pay for it. Many disabled people have to fight for it. It entitles me to park in the disabled bays at my son’s school (and anywhere else) when I have him with me and he will be getting out of the vehicle, or when I will be picking him up and putting him into the vehicle.

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These are four of the cars that were parked in the disabled spaces at my son’s school today. None of them is displaying a blue badge.

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Maybe their drivers aren’t aware that although this isn’t a public road the school still enforces the blue badge scheme? Maybe they thought they had a good reason to park in the disabled bays – all four of them? Maybe they were short of time? Maybe they’re just lazy? Well, in case any of them are reading this…

Here are some of the reasons I need to park in these bays:

  • Benjamin comes with a lot of equipment: not just a wheelchair, but a feeding pump, suction pump, medications, syringes, nappies. More equipment than I can fit on his wheelchair, which means I have to push it with one hand. The further I have to push it with one hand, the less safe that journey is for him. If I have my other children with me, well, they just have to take their chances.
  • If I have to park in a normal parking space (if I can get one), it is too narrow to get Benjamin’s wheelchair alongside the car. This means I have to park it (and him in it) behind the car, in the path of other vehicles looking for their own parking spaces.
  • If I have to park in a normal parking space (if I can get one), it is too narrow to get Benjamin’s wheelchair alongside the car. This means I have to carry him (all 18 kilos of him) round to the back of the car. I don’t mind the damage to my back. What I do mind is the risk of pulling out his feeding tube, which won’t stretch from his seat to behind the car. If his feeding tube is pulled out, he has to undergo an operation under general anaesthetic to replace it. When Benjamin undergoes an operation under general anaesthetic, he usually comes back ventilated and in intensive care.
  • If I have to park on the road (which I usually do, because if the disabled bays are full you can bet it’s because all the non-disabled bays are full), all of the above apply, plus I have to carry Benjamin out into the path of oncoming traffic.
  • If I have to park on the road, the likelihood is someone else will park so close up to the back of my car that I won’t be able to open the boot, let alone get Benjamin’s wheelchair into it.
  • One of Benjamin’s problems is that he cannot control his own temperature. In the extra time it takes me to get him out of a warm car into his buggy and under a blanket if the buggy is at the back of the car and not beside the door, he can become hypothermic. In the extra time it takes me to push the buggy from the main road to the school, he can become hypothermic. An extra couple of minutes in the cold can mean several hours of struggling to get his temperature and heart rate stabilized at a normal level.
  • If Benjamin becomes suddenly ill, which he does, often, without warning, and dangerously, I need to be able to pick him up and get him into the car and off to hospital, pronto. I may not have time to wait for an ambulance. I may not have time to drive around looking for a parking space, walk round the corner from that parking space to the school, and push Benjamin back round that corner to the car. Minutes count.

Here are some of the reasons you may not need to park in these bays:

  • You are not disabled
  • You don’t have a blue badge
  • You don’t have a disabled child
  • You don’t have a pile of medical equipment to transport
  • You can walk 100 yards without getting hypothermic (no, that’s not an exaggeration)
  • You can self-transfer to your car seat
  • You don’t need to get a wheelchair into your boot (God forbid need enough space to use a ramp or hoist…)

Now, you may think ‘I’m only parking there for a minute.’ But if that minute is the minute when Benjamin and I arrive at school, you’ve put us in an unsafe situation for the whole day.

You may think this is a small, petty issue. But this issue puts my son, and many others like him (after all, this is a school with a special unit attached that caters for children with severe and complex needs from across the county) at risk.

Please, think again. Thank you.

Our Inclusive Home

Just because it’s difficult, doesn’t make it right

A few of days ago an article popped up on my timeline. It was entitled How working in an abortion clinic changed my mind about terminations, and was written by a student midwife, Lucy Kelly. A bit ‘clickbaity,’ but I was baited and I clicked.

It is a beautifully written, convincing, strongly worded essay. The direction in which the author changed her mind (spoiler alert) was towards terminations. She wasn’t put off by what she bravely and compassionately witnessed, she was inspired by the fortitude of the women she met in that clinic. And some of what she wrote, yes, I do agree with. It is a terrible decision to have to make and I do not believe many parents take it lightly, whatever they decide.

But some of it, profoundly, no.

‘Women who are having late term abortions are only doing so if their baby will not have any quality of life outside the womb.’

Termination of pregnancy after 24 weeks may legally be considered, in the UK at least, on the grounds of foetal abnormality if there is a substantial risk that the child would suffer physical or mental abnormalities that would result in serious handicap. There is no definition, in the law, as to what constitutes a ‘substantial risk’ or a ‘serious handicap.’ Quality of life is not required to be evaluated.

Sadly, on this basis, women are undergoing mid and late term abortions of babies with Down syndrome, with spina bifida, with hydrocephalus, with cleft palate. Conditions which do not, necessarily, affect ‘quality of life,’ whatever that means. Let alone affect it so much as for it to be preferable to have no life at all. Who are we to decide, as mothers or as a society, that those lives are not worth living, or would be better not lived?

I was advised to abort my son at 38 weeks because his brain was not properly formed. Because he would likely never walk, talk or feed himself. Ours wasn’t one of those miracle stories you read in the Mail where the doctors are proved wrong. My son is indeed profoundly disabled – he will never walk, talk, feed himself. He will likely never roll, sit, or support his own head. However, I would dispute anyone who says he has no quality of life.

And, while the child’s quality of life may be one of the reasons (rightly or wrongly) for women to have a late term abortion, I know that it is not the only one. In fact, the child’s quality of life may be less important in the decision-making than the effect on the mother and any other members of the family. I know because I could have been one of those women. The arguments (and yes, there were arguments: painful, heated, lengthy and almost irreparable ones) surrounding our decision whether to abort, centred partly on our son’s likely quality of life, but partly on the impact on the rest of the family – myself, my husband, our at the time one-year-old daughter, the grandparents. Had we decided to abort – and don’t get me wrong, we very nearly did – it would have been in no small part for the latter reason: to ensure a better life for our existing daughter, to protect her from the isolation, stigma, and lack of opportunity that may come with being sibling to a disabled child. Protection that I believe could and should be achieved by changes in society: by inclusion, accessibility, support, kindness and a lack of judgment. Not by terminating the life of an innocent individual.

I do not doubt that the mothers, fathers, families, who choose abortion on the grounds of disability do so with much heart-searching. As, in fact, do those who choose abortion for other reasons. They may do it on the basis of misinformation. They may do it under strong pressure. They may do it because they truly believe they have no other option. But that does not make it right.

‘I cannot fathom how any politician can believe that they understand more about a woman’s health, and survival, than the doctor caring for her… This is not your life. This is not your pregnancy. This is not your experience. You do not get an opinion’

No, I cannot fathom that, but this is not just – or often even at all, except in incredibly rare and tragic circumstances – about the mother’s life. This is about – as Ms Kelly agrees from 24 weeks at least – a child’s life. The child whose life is at stake doesn’t get an opinion unless doctors, parents and policymakers give them one. That is our duty as a civilised and compassionate society – to give a voice to those who are voiceless.

‘Until you have lived this hell, made this decision, held the tension of two terrible fates and had the courage to make a choice that will break you to pieces, you do not get to judge a woman or decide what is best for her.’

I have lived this hell. I have made this decision. It still breaks me every single day. I am not judging these women; I am judging the circumstances they are placed in, the information they are given, the pressure that is brought to bear, and the expectations forced upon them by the misguided and mis-prioritised society that we live in.

I wonder if Ms Kelly is confusing respect for these mothers – which I share unreservedly – with agreement with their decision. Just because the decision was difficult, just because it was made thoughtfully, carefully, heartbreakingly, soul-searchingly… doesn’t make it right. The solution to this terrible, terrible dilemma is not to make it more acceptable, easier, less traumatic to abort a baby; the solution is to work change in our society so that it is easier to bear that baby, to birth that baby and to bring that baby up, whatever its nature and its circumstances.

**As a courtesy, I offered this piece to Spinoff, the site on which Ms Kelly’s article was published. They declined to publish, saying they weren’t ‘that kind of website’. I think it’s sad that they aren’t the kind of website that would like to show two perspectives on this issue; that they are willing to publish an opinion piece about a certain group of women, but not willing to publish the thoughts of one of those women; that they are not keen to be involved in working the kind of change in society that I describe above. I hope other readers will be**