Graduation Day

Since when did nursery graduations become a thing? I’m sure I never had one, but last year my eldest daughter had two, complete with ribbon-tied certificates, gowns, mortar boards (long relegated to the bottom of the dressing-up box), and the obligatory cake.

Lovely as they were, I couldn’t help thinking this was all a little bit contrived. Yes, it was nice to mark the end of one stage of their life and the beginning of the next, but these smiling, bouncing, excited youngsters weren’t moving on through any merit other than having achieved a certain age. Yes, my daughter had done a lot, grown a lot, developed a lot, and learned a lot at both her nurseries, in no small part thanks to the wonderfully dedicated and inspired staff, but she hadn’t finished anything – she was only just beginning. We got some nice photos, ate the cake, and moved on.

With Benjamin, however, graduation seems utterly fitting. The two years he’s spent in the Green Room are laden with real achievements to celebrate: holding his head up; looking to both sides; expressing likes and dislikes; anticipating; recognising signs; choosing activities; making music; making friends. Tiny steps that accumulate slowly but surely. Graduation allows us to look back and see just how far he’s come.

Benjamin certainly perfected the art of sleeping through anything that doesn’t interest him

Unlike his neurotypical sister, Benjamin’s achievements haven’t all been fun. The children in the Green Room have worked hard: walking and talking don’t come easy to them. Smiling, turning their heads, focusing their eyes are real challenges to some of them. Benjamin is exhausted at the end of each and every day (if not by lunchtime). Graduation is a chance to show him how proud we are of the effort he’s put in.

With a fragile, life-limited child, we never know if the current school year might be his last. He can go downhill so quickly we don’t know if each day might be his last. Our opportunities to make special memories are finite. Graduation is a precious source of photos and thoughts to cherish.

Benjamin, like many children with additional needs, goes to nursery (and will go to school) on the other side of the county. So I don’t see his teachers every day; I send him off in a taxi with his clinical support worker, and get a written report back on his return. I don’t see him interacting with other students; I rarely meet the other parents of children in his class. Graduation and other formal events are vital opportunities to meet Benjamin’s classmates (including his adorable best friend), to crystallize friendships with other parents with whom we actually share a great deal, to see the environment in which our son is being nurtured, and to meet with the people who care for, teach, inspire and monitor my little boy’s progress.

And what incredible people they are! Graduation Day is an (inadequate) opportunity to thank them for all they have done for Benjamin and for us over the past two years. These are not just teachers. They are carers, nurses, and friends, to Benjamin and to me. Theirs is not just a job but truly a vocation; they couldn’t do it otherwise. I trust them with my precious boy and they repay that trust a thousand times. Teaching and caring for children like Benjy is physically, mentally, and emotionally exhausting; saying goodbye to them is a wrench. On Graduation Day, we were all smiling through tears.

Despite their totally hands-on job, Benjamin’s teachers had somehow had time to make him a certificate and a book of hilariously-annotated photos of his time at nursery. There were presents and a video slideshow. There was cake and much-needed coffee. Graduation Day was a chance to relax, in the busy and stressful world of special needs parenting, to share a cuppa and a laugh with people who ‘just get it.’

It’s not just Benjamin who’s grown during his two years in the Green Room. I too have learned a lot. I’ve learned who to trust, when to ask for help, how to let go (to some extent), and when and how to fight like only a mama bear can. Graduation was a chance to reflect on how far we’ve all come over the past couple of years.

For a boy whose prenatal prediction was ‘incompatible with life,’ Benjamin continues to exceed expectations and defy predictions. For a child who was unlikely to start nursery, let alone finish it, Benjamin has beaten the odds. He’s passed huge milestones and, with the help of the Green Room staff, made irreplaceable memories. He might not have worn a mortarboard, but he’s built a legion of admirers who would in any case just have taken it off to stroke his hair. He’s a worthy graduate of the Green Room. Bring on Primary 1 (and don’t worry ladies, we’ll be popping back to nursery for cuddles very soon).

Can I have a wee rest over the holidays please?

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Captain Endurance and the Imperturbable Girls

I have to admit, I’m not really up on my superheroes. I understand things have moved on a bit from Thundercats (I wasn’t allowed to watch He-Man and the Masters of the Universe because it was on ITV and therefore infra dig). I’m painfully aware of the PJ Masks, thanks to my six-year-old and YouTube, but the whole Marvel Empire is largely a mystery to me.

However, I really don’t feel I’m missing out because I have daily contact with at least three superheroes of the absolute superest kind: my children.

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Leader of the gang, Benjamin, is ‘Captain Endurance’ because the number of unpleasant, frustrating, and downright tedious things he puts up with (and, often, sleeps through) without any fuss whatsoever is frankly astonishing.

He’s coped with four-hour seizures that were exhausting just to witness, not to mention the drugs needed to stop them – enough to put a horse to sleep. He’s undergone multiple surgeries under general anaesthetic. He tolerates being physically restrained for MRI scans, and multiple attempts to get a cannula into his veins at every hospital admission. Every few months a radiologist sticks a wire into his stomach and intestines, pulls out his feeding tube, and pushes a new one back in – a process that can take anything from ten minutes to four hours and generally makes Benjamin feel pretty sore and sick for a couple of days, not mention that the radiology suite requires a deep-clean afterwards to get the bile out of all the equipment.

Benjamin doesn’t complain at the worst pain of all – the application and subsequent removal of dressings each time his permanent IV port (he really is half-boy half-robot) is accessed, and that of the hyoscine patches that go behind his ear to reduce his dribbling. He is subjected to an unpleasant round of beating, shaking and squeezing going under the name of ‘chest physio’ twice daily (or more, if his little sister takes it upon herself to emulate the procedure).

At intervals throughout the day (up to half-hourly depending on how poorly he is), a catheter is forced down his nose and into his throat to suck out all the gunk that accumulates there – a procedure that must at the very least be uncomfortable if not distressing, yet Benjamin puts up with it; sometimes he even sleeps through it!

He’s on medications that can make you drowsy, medications that make you agitated, medications that taste horrible, smell horrible and drip all over his trousers. He’s fed nasty-smelling milk into his jejunum (the first part of the intestine) and is nil by mouth so he never experiences the sensation of food on his tongue or the satisfaction of a full stomach. From his vantage point in the kitchen he spends hours every day watching the rest of the family cook and eat meals, smelling curries bubbling, cakes baking, fish suppers fresh from the chippy, without ever getting to taste them himself. Yet he never seems to get frustrated or complain. Remarkably, neither do his wonderful carers who also arrive at tea-time yet aren’t allowed to partake.

However, this is preferable to what went before – months of being fed into his stomach only for the milk to reflux up his oesophagus and down into his lungs causing chronic chest problems. It’s also preferable to what went before that – a constant barrage of bottles and breasts trying to force milk of any kind into his undernourished little body, not being allowed to sleep for more than three hours at a timebefore another feed was due.

Then there’s the hours of waiting at out-patient appointments. There’s being weighed and measured and having the details of your bowel movements discussed in excruciating detail by your parents and a team of consultants and medical students. There’s sleeping constrained by a system of wedges that forces you to lie in a straight line no matter how much you want to curl up cosily in a ball. There’s never having shoes that fit, because by the time they’ve arrived from the Orthotics people you’ve inevitably grown out of them. There’s never having glasses that fit, because, well, no-one seems to be able to make glasses that fit you.

I think the thing that would frustrate me the most – although Benjamin bears it with beautiful grace – is never having control over even the minutiae of his own life. He is poked and prodded when he wants to sleep, and put to bed when he is not sleepy. He is constantly climbed on by his sisters, forced to watch their choice of programme on TV. He is cared for by carers he had no say in choosing (although he clearly loves them to bits), sent to respite when it suits the rest of the family, and generally surrounded by people with whom he can rarely communicate his desires. As yet, he shows no sign of annoyance at all the things he has to go through, no sign of frustration at the things he cannot do. I don’t know whether to wish for him to grow and develop to the point that he does get frustrated, or to want him to stay forever in a state of more-or-less blissful ignorance. And, since Benjamin’s condition has no overarching diagnosis and therefore no prognosis, I have no idea which scenario is more likely.

So yes, Benjamin is super-patient, super-tolerant, super-uncomplaining. He is Captain Endurance. He’s also super-amazing! Before he was born, it was predicted that he wouldn’t survive birth: he not only survived, he needed nothing more than a little rub to get him going, he registered the same APGAR score as his sisters, he spent zero time in the neonatal unit, and was discharged from hospital five days after he was born. It was predicted he would never be able to breastfeed and would need an NG-tube from day one: this superhero breastfed like a trooper until the age of 17 months. It was predicted he would be blind and would never recognise his family: Benjamin sees, recognises, tracks and smiles at the faces of people he knows and loves. Our little man works so, so hard to achieve every tiny milestone, superhero-style.

And is this a surprise? No, because Benjamin comes from a family of superheroes; just look at his sisters, ‘The Imperturbable Girls’! Among his little sister’s first words were ‘syringe’ and ‘suction.’ At the age of two, she can conduct a pretty rigorous round of chest physio when Benjy is least expecting it. At six, his elder sister can look after the little one when I need to look after Benjy; she fetches nappies and muslins, passes me the right size of suction catheter, and knows how to dial 999. Both accept uncomplainingly that they never get to travel further than Granny’s house, that sometimes we can’t go places that have too many steps or no suitable toilet; that we have strangers in our house every evening, that most school holidays will involve at least one long boring day playing on the iPad in A&E.

They put up with all of this because they don’t know anything different. Neither of them can remember a time before Benjamin. Neither of them has seen enough of other children’s home-lives to know that ours is unusual. They don’t know anything different – yet. Unlike Benjamin, they will definitely come to a point when they realise they are missing out. When they start to count the differences between their lives and their friends. Already, although they sleep through the ambulances arriving in the night, they remember for months the mornings that Benjamin wasn’t there when they woke up.

Having a ‘SWAN’ (Syndromes Without a Name; a child with a condition of unknown cause) for a brother will make this harder, as there is no easy explanation for any of us to fall back on. I can’t tell Benjamin’s sisters why he is like he is, and they can’t explain to their friends either. They live in a world of uncertainty because I can’t tell them what will happen tomorrow, next year, or in ten years’ time, for Benjamin or for them. So, imperturbable, yes; unaffected, no, and increasingly no as they get older.

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My superheroes in their super-mobile (and a half naked doll for some reason)

In many ways, caring for Benjamin is easy: it’s all practical stuff. I can lift him, bathe him, feed him, medicate him, clear his airways and time his seizures. I can call an ambulance when I know I’ve done all I can. All I can do for my girls is to try to provide them with the support they need when they might need it: their school teachers are aware, they are on the waiting list for our heavily-oversubscribed young carers’ group, I try to let them know they can talk to me about anything and I will do my best to make things right. Perhaps the best way I can help them is to build on their superhero abilities by making their superhero status super-cool! They are part of the SWAN club! They get to join SWAN days out, share SWAN balloons, wear funky hoodies in groovy colours, and meet other SWAN siblings with similar superpowers. And I know – along with their SWAN pals, they will grow up to be super-accepting, super-inclusive, super-tolerant, super-gentle, super-strong, and with a super sense of fairness and justice. True superheroes.

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As to Benjy, how will he grow up? Will he continue to push the boundaries of what is possible? Will he become a ‘SWAN graduate’ with a firm diagnosis? Will he join the ranks of SWAN angels gone far too soon but held forever in our hearts? Whatever happens, he’ll always be a superhero to us.

Friday 27 April is Undiagnosed Children’s Day 2018. Support the Superheroes: Text SWAN18 £3 (or any amount up to £10) to 70070. #UCDsuperhero

Postcode Lottery

I’ve always thought of myself as fortunate. Opportunities have landed in my path. My parents bought a house in the catchment area for a good school. My teachers saw to it that I got into a good university. That good education got me a job that I love. I have three beautiful children. My husband works hard so that I don’t have to choose between my career and spending time with my children. Childbirth aside, touch wood, I have never needed a night in hospital. I have not yet been reliant on benefits. We have been able to choose, get a mortgage for, and afford a deposit on, a perfect home in a stunning part of the world.

Benjamin looking contented, wearing a warm jacket in a SN buggy

Comfy in his new buggy

Now we have Benjamin, still, we are fortunate. The healthcare he receives is second-to-none. He gets all the therapy in the community that he needs. All the equipment that he requires is also provided (albeit a little slow to arrive at times). He attends a wonderful SEN nursery and will attend a wonderful SEN school. He has a dedicated pair of support workers who keep him safe (and give him many, many cuddles) whenever I am not with him. Social care-funded agency carers help us for six hours a week, Benjamin gets two nights a month in a specialist respite care unit, and we have the support of our children’s hospice whenever we need it. Benjamin gets disability living allowance, we have a car through Motability and a blue badge. Our house will soon be adapted to suit Benjamin’s needs and the local authority will fund 80% of the cheapest option as quoted by the cheapest supplier; moreover, the work will should be completed by the time we really need it! Yes, we had to fill out some forms and write some letters. Yes, we had to dig around to find out what we were entitled to and we had to fight a little to get some of that. Yes, once or twice I have had to write to my MP and the local paper. But, generally, we get what Benjamin needs and what we as a family need. We are indeed fortunate, or so I thought.

Benjy in his kitchen chair, with Caitlin sitting on his lap, her hand on his chest as if doing chest physio

Expert physio

Then, I started talking to other parents. Some families, in local authorities not too far away, get 12 hours nursing care a day. Some families get additional care in the school holidays. Some families received an automatic referral to psychological support to help them to deal with the trauma surrounding giving birth to a child with severe disabilities. Some families get twenty new syringes a day. Some families get liquid drugs so they don’t have to faff around crushing and grinding tablets to within an inch of their life to ensure they don’t block the feeding tube… I started to feel less fortunate. I started to feel jealous.

Then, I started talking to other parents. Some families’ only respite centre is being closed down. Some families have to self-fund essential equipment such as a suitable wheelchair. Some families can’t get a blue badge even though some days their child can’t get out of bed. Some families have to fight and fight and fight and go to court and pour every ounce of their energy and resources into fighting to get their child into a school that simply meets their needs. Some parents are forced to give up that battle, give up their career, and home-school their children. Some carers are carrying 50 kg children up and down stairs, or risking their backs lifting them into the bath because adaptations plans have stalled. Some families are crammed into a single room in a bed-and-breakfast because their local authority can’t find, won’t build, or refuse to adapt, a suitable property for their needs. Some children have seen half-a-dozen different paediatricians and never the same one twice. Some children have been discharged from all the services that might be able to help them. Some parents are accused of faking their child’s condition, or of poor parenting. Some are pushed so close to breaking point that they fear having their children taken away… Some families have their children taken away. I started to feel like the luckiest mother on earth. There, but for the grace of God, go I.

Why does it have to be like this?

Why do families at different ends of the same street, let alone different ends of the country, have to meet different criteria to get the same support? Why do families in very similar circumstances receive such vastly different levels of care (if any)? Why are we placed in these situations where we feel jealous, or guilty; where we have to compete? Why can’t there be a level playing field? Why isn’t access to support – health, education, social care, housing, advocacy – based on need and not on where you live, how deep you dig for information, how hard you’re prepared to fight, how well educated you are, who you know, who you can afford to employ, whether you are able to give up work, even whether you earn little enough to qualify for support (yes, it can work both ways)?

A circle of reusable nappies in a range of pastel shades

‘Why does it have to be like this?’ I asked Jenny Gilruth MSP at a recent round table discussion at the Scottish Parliament, Getting it Right for Parents of Children with Exceptional Healthcare Needs. She said I couldn’t expect everything to be centralised. But I’m not asking for provision to be centralised, I’m just asking for the rules, the criteria, the tick-boxes, the ‘decision making tools’ to be standardised. It could be as simple as saying ‘which area provides an example of good practice in terms of [insert essential service here]? Let’s employ their strategy across the board.’ How can it be so difficult to ensure, for example, that all children with continence needs should receive enough suitable continence products to meet their needs from the same age? Presently, some NHS boards provide pads from age three, others age five; some areas won’t supply pull-ups and others won’t supply cloth nappies; and some children get three pads per day while others get an unlimited supply. It should be as simple as every relevant organisation paying more than lip service to GIRFEC (Getting it Right for Every Child, in Scotland, or its English and Welsh equivalent Every Child Matters).

We might live at different ends of the country, but unlike some politicians, policymakers and bureaucrats, SEN parents do talk to each other. We know there are discrepancies, huge discrepancies. We share as much knowledge and as many tricks as we can to help each other out, to level the hideously uneven playing field we find ourselves on. We try to get around the borders that divide us and to fight as a team, while the system tries to make us compete to be the loudest voice clamouring for limited funding and limited support. We know it’s a postcode lottery, and we know it’s all our children that are losing out.

Lottery tickets, a pen, Euro notes and coins

The last thing I want is respite

My family are the best. Not the best behaved. Not the cleanest and tidiest. Not the most talented. Not even the best at getting on together. But all different and complementary, hilarious and frustrating in equal measures, we love each other to bits even when we’re fighting, and I cannot ever imagine life without any one of them.

But keeping a family, even the best family, going is hard work. Breastfeeding a fifteen month-old the size of a baby hippo is hard work. Stopping a five year-old from watching Paw Patrol all day is hard work. Doing an hour of chest physio every morning before the school run is hard work. Pushing a wheelchair with one hand and a five year-old on a bicycle with the other up a hill whilst carrying the aforementioned baby hippo on your front is hard work.

Half-sleeping with a video monitor three inches from your ear every night takes its toll. Keeping a running total of your earnings in your head each month so you don’t go over the limit and lose your carer’s allowance takes its toll. Writing letters to the council to try and get the support Benjamin needs to attend nursery takes its toll. Driving sixty miles a day to and from the hospital takes its toll.

So don’t get me wrong, I need respite. I know that we are incredibly fortunate to get respite and I am embarrassingly grateful for it. When Benjy is at respite we do things we can’t do when he is with us, like taking the girls to a birthday party at an inaccessible venue, like having a late night and a late lie the next morning. Like, er, hoovering the car out and washing all the covers on his chair. So we do access respite, and we appreciate it enormously, even if we do phone morning and night to see how Benjy is doing, and our family always feels like something is missing until he comes home.

We need respite, but when often I feel pulled in three, no four (don’t forget hubby), no five (I do have a job), maybe even six (can I include me?) different directions; when I want to be there for all my children but they are all in different parts of the county; when I just haven’t got enough arms for all the cuddles that are needed, the last thing I want is for someone to take one of my family off my hands. When my child is classed as ‘life-limited,’ and the time we have with him may be short, the last thing I want is respite.

What I want is a way to be with all my family, so that they are all safe, all their needs are met, and there is plenty of time for love and laughter and cuddles. So that I have two hands to hold them and not one taken up with a syringe or catheter. So that I have two ears to hear their stories and not one always listening out for a crisis.

That’s what Rachel House provides.

We are lucky enough to be here at the moment, on the shores of beautiful Loch Leven on the hottest weekend of the year. Last night I had a glass of wine with my husband under the stars while all three children slept. Yesterday we wandered around the farmer’s market, stroked some baby lambs, met friends for a picnic, a catch-up and an impromptu ice cream – Benjy included. In the evening we played with the girls in the garden while Benjy had a bath with underwater lights. This morning I had a massage and the girls and Daddy played with Benjy in the jacuzzi. Then we’ll all sit down to a proper Sunday lunch.

Rachel House is one of Scotland’s two children’s hospices, run by CHAS, Children’s Hospices Across Scotland. The wonderful staff provide top quality care for Benjamin: they do his meds, his feeds, his physio, …, all the boring stuff, but still let us join in the playtime, the goodnight kisses and the good morning cuddles. They free up the part of my brain that’s usually filled with when Benjy’s next medications are due, how much feed he’s had, whether his chest is sounding crackly and ‘is that just dystonia or is it a seizure?’ so that I can give the girls the whole of my attention for once (if they aren’t too busy painting with the activities team, dressing up in the playroom, or charging round the garden on bikes and diggers). And they provide top quality care for us, too, in the form of comfy beds, home-cooked meals and as much coffee and cake as we can manage.

Rachel House lets me give the girls some time, our marriage some time, even get some ‘me-time,’ without missing out on my Benjy smiles and Benjy cuddles. And Benjy smiles and Benjy cuddles are very frequent at Rachel House. So no matter how many of them the staff try to sneak, there’s always plenty left for us.

Rachel House gives us time, space and support to be a family. It lets us recharge so we function better as a family when we get home. It lets us relax as if we are part of their family. Respite has its place, but when the last thing you want is respite, Rachel House is the place to be.

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Obligatory cheesy family photo courtesy Katrina Lear Photography (http://katrinalearphotography.co.uk/)

**Today marks the last day of Children’s Hospice Week, organised by Together for Short Lives. This year the aim of the week is to turn up the volume on children’s palliative care, to raise awareness about the number and needs of children with life-limiting conditions and to celebrate all the lifeline services that children and families rely on; to amplify families’ voices and change people’s perceptions about some of the myths surrounding children’s palliative care. Our children’s hospice, Rachel House is run by Children’s Hospices Across Scotland. Find out how you can help CHAS here. Thank you**

Benjamin doesn’t tick boxes

An open letter to the Head of Education at East Lothian Council

Dear Ms Robertson,

Not having a tracheostomy is a good thing, isn’t it? Not being on TPN, not needing daily IVs, that’s good, isn’t it? Not if it means you can’t access the support you need.

I am sending you an open letter, because your response to my previous, urgent email about my son’s education was met – more than a week later – with a dismissive, incorrectly addressed, response from a ‘service administrator’ advising that it had been forwarded to ‘appropriate personnel who will respond in due course.’

If this administrator had actually read my letter, she would have seen that I am not ‘Mr Davey’ but Dr Davey, Benjamin’s mother (even ‘Mrs’ would have done), and that this matter requires a response not ‘in due course’ but urgently, and not by ‘appropriate personnel’ but by someone at the very highest level who has the ability and resources to make things happen, and make things happen fast.

This is Benjamin. Benjamin is undiagnosed. He has multiple, complex, interrelating conditions affecting many organs and systems of his body, but we don’t know why. When something is wrong, it is difficult to tell which part went wrong first. Chest or stomach? Breathing issues or muscle tone or a seizure?

Benjamin is intractable. Benjamin smiles when he is happy or with people that he loves. Benjamin also smiles when he is in pain. Benjamin tenses up when he is trying to reach for something, and also when he is trying to pull away, and when he is distressed.

When Benjamin is well, he’s very well. On a good day he only needs his regular medications, four times a day, his inhaler and a saline nebuliser once a day, chest physio and suctioning twice a day, a few checks of his gastrostomy and his temperature and you’re done! When he’s poorly, he can be very poorly. He may, within a couple of hours, become so dehydrated he needs IV fluids. He may produce so many thick secretions that he cannot breathe. He may have a tonic-clonic seizure that is resistant to rescue medication and lasts up to four hours. His temperature may drop so low it cannot be recorded with a regular thermometer. His heart rate can drop to 30 or rise to 180 beats per minute. His muscles can become so tense it is impossible to bend him into a sitting position. He can vomit fluorescent green slime out of his nose (Britain’s Got Talent, are you reading?). Benjamin can go downhill very rapidly and recover almost equally rapidly. Sometimes it is impossible to tell whether he is deteriorating or improving. Benjamin needs someone on hand, 24/7, who is able to respond to all these medical eventualities.

Benjamin doesn’t tick boxes. Benjamin doesn’t meet criteria. Especially when we don’t know what criteria he is being measured against. Especially when the ‘professional’ opinion is that he doesn’t even justify being tested against the criteria. Benjamin confuses panels and confounds ‘decision making tools.’

Benjamin, like all three year olds in Scotland, is entitled to 600 hours of funded early learning and childcare per year. Benjamin has a place at a fantastic special needs nursery, attached to the special needs school provision where he will hopefully eventually receive full-time education.

Benjamin loves nursery. He loves his teachers. He loves painting and baking, soft play and ‘body awareness’. He loves the sensory area and he loves when he gets a foot massage.

I love Benjamin’s nursery. But I don’t want to be there the entire time that he is there. Like other mums of three year olds in Scotland, I am entitled to 600 hours early learning and childcare for Benjamin per year to allow me to care for and spend time with my other children, to catch up on paperwork (oh, the paperwork), to catch up on laundry (oh, the laundry), to have a coffee, go for a pee, read a magazine, get my haircut. God forbid, I could even do my job.

But, since Benjamin started his three year provision in early January, I have had to accompany him to nursery because there is no-one there who can meet his medical needs. This was intended to be a temporary arrangement until either his nursery staff could be trained to meet his needs (voluntarily, because they are wonderful, caring people who will go beyond the requirements of their role as long as it is safe to do so), or until provision could be put in place for a medical professional to be with him at nursery. This would be a ‘reasonable adjustment’ as required under the Equalities Act to ensure that Benjamin can safely attend the education to which he is entitled.

As it transpires, Benjamin is too complex to be cared for by nursery staff. They are, after all, teachers, nursery nurses and classroom assistants. They are not medical professionals. (I am not a medical professional but, since having Benjamin, I might as well be). They cannot be expected to, should not be expected to, take decisions about Benjamin’s highly complex, variable, unpredictable and rapidly-changing health needs.

Benjamin’s teachers can be trained to do chest physio but not how to tell when chest physio might make his wheezing worse.

Benjamin’s teachers can be trained how to suction him but not how to tell when he needs suction or when it would cause too much trauma.

Benjamin’s teachers can be trained to aspirate his gastrostomy but not when that is necessary, how to evaluate the contents of his stomach, when to discard them, when to stop his feed, when to switch him to a different feed regime, when to worry, or when to take him to hospital.

Benjamin’s teachers can be trained to administer his feeds but not to evaluate what rate is appropriate for his stomach at any given time.

Benjamin’s teachers can be trained to clean up if he vomits but not how to tell if some vomit has got into his lungs, if he is getting dangerously dehydrated, whether he needs to go home on dioralyte or go immediately onto IV fluids.

Benjamin’s teachers can be trained to administer his medications but not to determine when he needs a higher dose than usual.

If Benjamin’s teachers make the wrong decision, because they are not medical professionals, he could end up in A&E wasting everyone’s time, or he could end up gravely ill. It wouldn’t be their fault. It shouldn’t be their responsibility.

And yet, because Benjamin doesn’t have a tracheostomy, because he is not on a ventilator, or on TPN or regular IVs, nobody will assess him for the Lothian Exceptional Needs Service for Children with Exceptional Health Care Needs (LENS) scheme, despite that he fulfils many of its ‘issues relating to need’ including needing ‘sustained medical support … seven days per week,’ requiring ‘professional trained intervention on a regular basis or in response to an acute incident in order to prevent acute hospital admissions,’ demanding ‘a degree of complex problem solving, and revision of the child’s care plan, on an hour by hour or day by day basis,’ and an inability or lack of competence of carers to meet these needs.

Because no-one will even bother to assess Benjamin for the LENS scheme, he has been downgraded to the frankly mythical HESS (Healthcare and Education Support Service). Because no-one will supply us with a copy of the criteria for referral to HESS, we do not know what boxes he needs to tick. Because the member of staff responsible for making the referral has been slowly drip-feeding us the information we need to supply and the evidence that needs to be provided, rather than giving us a clear outline of the application requirements from the start, it has taken far longer than it should have to put all that evidence together, extending the process well beyond the end of last term and into the next. Because parents apparently have no input into this information, only ‘professionals,’ there is no one to complete the documentation: I, his parent, am the one taking care of him at nursery because there is no professional there trained to do that (Anyone else thinking Catch 22 here…?). Because East Lothian has never even signed up to the HESS scheme, there is no guarantee that Benjamin will get the support he needs through it, and in the meantime we are left waiting, hanging, clinging to the concept of a ‘decision making tool’ that we have never seen and know nothing about. From Christmas to Easter, and now into the summer term…

I know this isn’t your fault, Ms Robertson. If anything, it’s mine: fancy agreeing to go to nursery with Benjamin as a temporary measure until something more permanent was organised? How gullible was that? Of course, that removes any incentive for anything permanent to be organised! I know this isn’t your fault, Ms Robertson, but it is your responsibility, so that’s why I’m writing to you (again) now. I’m no longer prepared to give up my time and my family’s time to provide something that should be provided to Benjamin as a right. The buck stops with you and it stops now.

There are many possible solutions. You could answer – and even fast-track – my request for Benjamin to receive a Coordinated Support Plan. You could provide all special school provisions in East Lothian with a full-time school nurse. You could support Benjamin’s immediate referral to the LENS scheme. He cannot be the only child in the county who needs this kind of support? Even if he is the only one without a tracheostomy…

I don’t want to be one of those mothers. The difficult ones. The ones who kick up a fuss. The ones who go to their MP and MSP and write viral posts on Facebook and go to the press. I am nervous. I wonder, is it too early to protest? The HESS application is, after all, still ongoing. The school staff say they are drawing up a ‘timeline’. The nice lady at the council says she has sent some emails. But how long do we have to wait before we start working together on ‘Plan B’? Do I and the nursery actually have to call your bluff, refuse to provide essential medical support for Benjamin, in order for someone to take us seriously? Does it have to wait until my family is at crisis point?

I don’t want to be one of those mothers, but believe me, I will. If Benjamin does not tick your boxes, your boxes are the wrong shape. If Benjamin doesn’t meet your criteria, you need to rethink the criteria. If Benjamin doesn’t fit your ‘decision making tools’ then those tools are not fit for purpose. Maybe together we can make some better tools?

Yours,

Benjamin’s mum

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