Just a cold

The males in our household have been stricken with a cold. My husband has adopted the standard attitude of shuffling around the house looking sheepish, occasionally being wracked by paroxysms of coughing that needlessly shake his entire body, and ostentatiously ironing handkerchiefs and boiling kettles for uncertain purpose. This in itself is pretty hard work for the females of the family (with the exception of the guinea pigs who seem remarkably unbothered by the whole thing).

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No preschool today

Benjy, however, takes it to another level. It usually begins with a sudden dramatic increase in secretions (i.e., snot). During his morning physio routine, a white froth starts pouring from his nose. He’ll need suctioning every half an hour, day and night, rather than twice a day.

He’ll be uncomfortable – as you or I would be – but he cannot tell me so. Instead, his muscles will tense, he’ll be stiff, hot, jumpy and irritable, making me fear a seizure. He won’t sleep, and neither will I.

After a couple of days the secretions will thicken and he’ll wake choking in the middle of the night. This is the scariest time, frantically suctioning a frightened boy to clear enough of his airway so that he can breathe. His heart rate rockets and so does mine. I try to remember that, despite all his complex requirements and specialist equipment, Benjamin is still just a little boy with a cold. I give ibuprofen and Calpol, drop Olbas oil on his pillow and place bowls of steaming water in his room.

Then the wheezing starts – ‘viral induced wheeze’ they call it. Although his secretions are clearing, his oxygen levels are dropping. So it’s sixteen puffs of his salbutamol inhaler a day – twelve at scheduled times and four to keep in reserve for that middle-of-the-night panic.

A week in, and when most of us would be starting to get over it, the rest of his system starts to respond. This is what would have put us in hospital last year but now we are (hopefully) equipped to deal with it at home. With Benjy – and this is typical of jejunum-fed children, I’m assured by our patient specialist gastrointestinal nurse on the phone – his output of stomach juices and bile increases dramatically. So dramatically that they can’t all drain out into a bile-bag, but end up being vomited out of his mouth and nose. Now I know all our kids are superheroes, but sometimes I really wish Benjy’s superpower wasn’t firing green slime out of his nostrils onto his poor unsuspecting support worker…

IMG_20171220_221317_051.jpgWith the vomiting comes an increased risk that Benjamin will aspirate his stomach contents into his lungs and cause a chest infection. Our amazing team of ‘rapid response’ specialist respiratory physios come to the house to assess him and take swabs for analysis. We embark on a cause of strong antibiotics in addition to the prophylactic antibiotics that he is on permanently through the winter, just in case. We put Benjy to sleep on his side (worse for his back, better for his lungs). I ‘sleep’ with the video-monitor inches from my face, ready to leap up when I hear him cough. I wonder how we’ll manage in the New Year when we move him to a downstairs room.

The antibiotics have their usual effect of (without going into too much detail here) producing nappies that require an entire change of clothes, several times a day. I resort to sitting him on an incontinence pad to save washing his chair, car seat, or buggy. And I double his daily dose of Imodium. But he goes 48 hrs between bile-vomits, which is an improvement. We feel safe to send him to our wonderful NHS respite centre for a couple of nights. I feel glad they will be dealing with the nappies. I keep my fingers crossed they don’t panic and send him to the hospital.

I don’t know how much it has cost the NHS to see Benjamin through one simple cold – providing us with a sats monitor, suction machine, catheters, nebulisers, inhalers, medications; giving us the expert assistance of doctors, pharmacists, nurses and physios. I know it’s cost our family about a fortnight’s sleep, two swimming lessons, one meeting about Changing Places toilets and a whole lot of Christmas shopping.

But for all of us, this is infinitely better than having Benjamin in hospital, splitting our family up and putting him at risk of catching all manner of other winter bugs. I’m proud of what we’ve achieved, and I’m grateful for the equipment and training we’ve been given and the trust that has been placed in us, to keep Benjamin safe at home. Team Benjamin has risen to the challenge, so far.

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On the mend

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4 thoughts on “Just a cold

  1. Wow Alex. You have done amazingly to keep Bengy out of hospital! Exciting that the house work starting soon!! Have a fabulous Christmas Jane. X

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