When life just carries on as normal

If you’re a parent, you’ll likely remember the feeling (how could you ever forget?) of emerging, blinking, into the light. Maybe from the hospital doorway; maybe your own front door. Maybe the very same day that precious bundle made its dramatic entry into the world; maybe one, two, or many, many days later. And… nobody notices. Everyone is rushing past on their way to work or wherever. Heads down. Headphones on. Grim faces. As they do every day. How can they? How can they just carry on as normal, as if nothing has happened. When the world is so changed? When for you, everything has changed.

If you’re not a parent, perhaps you felt it the morning after you first slept with the love of your life. Why can’t the world see I’m different? That nothing will ever be the same again.

The emotion is akin to that (and this is my poorest analogy, but I am an unashamed academic) I felt as a student when I’d been up all night writing the best essay of my life (only to have it shot down in a tutorial a few days later!). Tired but exhilarated. The world seems shifted: clearer, fresher, better resolved. In part delirium, in part clarity of thought, both probably born of exhaustion more than anything else.

It’s that feeling I get when I’ve been up all night saving a life.

His sats are dropping. I never believe the sats monitor but these are really dropping. He’s going blue. Literally choking on his own secretions. There’s no time to shout for help (and the last thing you want is to wake his sisters to see him like this; to see you, like this). There’s no time to call an ambulance, nothing like enough time. There’s no-one else. Just me, naked, a suction machine and a thin catheter. Catheter after catheter. Cursing the packets as I fumble them open. Cursing my shaking hands as I follow the tortuous path from his nose down towards his lungs. Holding my own breath until finally he can breathe again. Holding him close until his colour returns to normal. Kissing his forehead until, shivering with cold and fear, I creep back under the duvet, holding my sleeping husband for reassurance, holding the video-monitor next to my face.

I realise paramedics do this all the time. And nurses. Firefighters; lifeboatmen; midwives. I guess maybe they get used to it? Maybe it’s different when it’s your own child?

I am lucky. I have had to save his life maybe ten, maybe a dozen times only. Some mothers I know daren’t sleep unless there is an overnight carer with their child, maybe not even then. They lie with an oxygen bag and mask in their hands, ready to breathe for their child who may stop breathing several times a night.

And in the morning, I get up (or stay up). What else is there to do? There’s no time for self-indulgence, I’ve a family to run. Make a strong coffee, have a shower. Walk the girls to school. Hang out the washing. Busyness is good; I don’t want to sit and think.

I rarely tell anyone. “Did you sleep well dear?” “Not great…” How do you start a conversation with “I saved a life last night”?

And the feeling passes. Dwindles. Fades. Everything in my life returns to normal too. At least it has every time so far. Until the day I fail. One day I will fail and then nothing will ever be normal again.

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8 thoughts on “When life just carries on as normal

  1. I’m just lost for words reading this piece, I think it’s so important to write about it, I’d never read any of your posts before but I’ve just started following. I too often feel how can we just go back to normal after an event happens, I just felt like I was with you in every part of that piece. Such an amazing piece of writing x

    Liked by 1 person

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