Torn

We are just back from weekend trip to Aberdeen. I say ‘we’. I mean my husband and I, and the two girls. Our first trip away without Benjamin.

I think we pulled off a pretty good impression of a ‘normal’ family on a ‘normal’ trip. Dare I say ‘minibreak’? A few bags slung into the boot along with sledges just on the off-chance – no squeezing in of feeding supplies, nebulisers, and suction catheters around the wheelchair. We stayed in a simple family hotel room – no phoning round for hours to find anywhere with a wheelchair accessible room that would sleep five (actually, I did phone around for hours before I remembered that, this time, Benjy wasn’t coming with us. Doh.).

But for me it was far from normal. My normal is with Benjy, and Benjy was away having his own holiday. We are fortunate to have access to a specialised, nurse-led, NHS children’s respite service, the kind of service that is under great threat in many parts of the country. We are grateful they can accommodate Benjamin for a weekend once a month – enough time for us to really make time for the girls. We are thankful that the staff have worked with us to get to know Benjamin well enough that we can entrust him to them.

But still, I’m torn. I don’t want to move too fast. We could have flown to New York for the weekend! But no, take it slow, baby steps, for all of us but mostly, if I’m honest, for me. So Aberdeen was a test run, somewhere we could get back from within a few hours at any time of the day or night. A test run for the logistics, yes, but also a test run for the emotions.

A six year old girl in snow-gear, arms outstretched, standing on a rock on a snowy hill

On top of the world (or a small hill in Aberdeenshire)

Sure, it was simpler and easier. Sure we could do things – like visit friends with inaccessible houses, like climb a snowy hill, like stay out later than usual – that we can’t do with Benjamin. The girls had a ball, singing songs in the car, playing in the snow, exploring the hotel, ransacking the snacks, a longer bath and a later bedtime. I can’t say we got any more sleep than we do at home – two excited girls and a late night in one room doesn’t compute. Add to that all the packing, and driving. It wasn’t exactly a rest, and it wasn’t a family holiday – how could it be, without Benjamin?

Sure, Benjy doesn’t seem to miss us. He enjoys the attention and the activities and the lovely lady nurses! But does he realise? Does he know that we’ve gone away without him? That we’re having family time without him, because it’s easier; because it’s too much trouble to take him with us? I wouldn’t dream of leaving his sisters with anyone else overnight at the age of four; how can I justify treating him differently? Especially when his needs are so great and his time with us may be short.

What if he gets sick and I’m not there to interpret how he’s feeling? What if the worst happens? Even if the worst doesn’t happen, we are all missing out on precious time with Benjamin. Will we regret these lost hours when there are no more hours with him to be had? Have I drunk in enough of him that I will remember his scent? The feel of his cheek? The little noises he makes when he senses I am near? Have I taken enough photos of his little freckled nose? Have I let his sisters have enough cuddles to last them a lifetime?

But his sisters can’t live their lives within an hour of the hospital. They can’t keep missing out just in case. They need to live now, experience the things their friends do now; they need Mummy and Daddy’s undivided attention, now. And I need time away from Benjamin to realise just how much I do miss him, to appreciate how much he means to me as a little boy, as my son, as my daughters’ sibling, rather than a patient and a full-time job.

So, hard though it is, it is good for us all to have this time apart. It wasn’t a family holiday and it wasn’t meant to be. All we can do is to make the most of our time away, to do things we can’t usually do, go places we can’t usually go, to spoil the girls and spoil each other, to try not to argue and try not to feel guilty if we do. And when we get back together, all we all want to do is hold Benjamin close, hug him tight, listen to his welcoming murmurs, kiss him gently, kiss him hard, hold him some more and appreciate being a family once again.

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