In the shadow of Storm Brian

“You on your own then?” (I hasten to add this isn’t a #metoo story; this was a genuine expression of surprise/concern).

“Well my husband will be here soon [before it bloody rains, selfish ****]. He’s cycling from Scotland.”

“Ah (eyeing the back end of a five year old that has already spotted a rabbit and is disappearing across the caravan park at the speed of light). He knows which side his bread’s buttered.”

“Well there wasn’t really room in the car for him anyway, what with all the medical equipment, and, erm, children. And wine.”

“Aye. I can see who wears the trousers in your house.”

And with that, the master of metaphor sauntered off to show me the only island of grass that was suitable for tents (i.e., not under water) in this ridiculously late part of the season. Is the end of October even in ‘the season’?

Once I had unloaded the boot, laid the tent out, and fed the girls an entire week’s ration of Quavers in a vain attempt to stop them walking goose shit into the car, said husband did arrive.

“How was your journey?” I asked. “Bit of a head wind. I can recommend the cake at the Chain Bridge Honey Farm.” Cake? You stopped for cake and left me here with three kids singing ‘the baby’s done a poo, the baby’s done a poo’ (thanks Nick Cope, we do all love you really) and a pile of goose shit, waiting for Storm Brian (a fitting name for Britain’s answer to Hurricane Ophelia) to piss all over us? AND you expect a space in the car on the way home??

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Nice weather for ducks

Miraculously, we got the tent up before the night’s deluge hit. Miraculously we cooked up pasta and reheated Bolognese sauce without setting fire to the tent, and fed it to the children without spilling too much onto the pristine (ha! Of course we didn’t clean the tent before putting it away last time – it took us a fortnight just to get it dry) groundsheet.

After tea we got Benjamin ensconced in his mound of pillows and snuggled in his sleeping bag with a few blankets thrown in for good measure (think ‘The Princess and the Pea’ but with an inco-pad and a bobble hat on) and then the two still very excited girls snuggled into their sleeping bags. One of the advantages of camping at this time of year is it’s at least dark when you put the children to bed so there’s more of a chance of them sleeping. On the other hand, if one of them decides to play boobie-tennis and sing Old MacDonald all night long it can seem like a VERY long night. Time to grab a quick shower before the party…

_20171102_223107.JPGYou know you’re in for a treat when the campsite bathroom comes fully equipped with a mop and a bucket of stinking water… Actually the showers were wonderfully hot and remarkably clean and despite the lack of any form of screen or curtain only a small river escaped into the rest of the room. Which I managed to drop my pants in. Every. Single. Time.

“How did you get on last night?” asked the site manager (somewhat smugly, I thought). “We all stayed dry!” I said, thinking this was quite an achievement given the torrential downpour that had lasted all night (and omitting to mention my pants). And certainly an improvement on our first night here last year… “Forecast has changed,” he smirked, “Storm Brian’s been delayed until today.”

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Storm Brian has been delayed…

I hurriedly put the kettle on for what might be our last cuppa before the Great Flood. Then followed the usual debate: “How can a kettle take this long to boil?” “We can’t be running out of gas already?” Gives gas canister a shake. “How do you tell if a gas canister is getting empty?” “Weigh it.” “We haven’t got any scales.” “Maybe it’s just too windy.” “Maybe you filled the kettle too full.” Kettle eventually boils and we are none the wiser as to why it takes so long to do so when camping, but the gas canister never appears to quite run out.

Children washed and tea drunk, we embarked on our ‘holiday activities’. As the days passed and the mud deepened, the site owner strove to prevent anyone getting their vehicles stuck, by parking increasing numbers of caravans over the roughest parts. I understand the intention, but the result was that we had to drive – slowly enough not to hit any of the protruding parts of said caravans, yet fast enough not to get stuck in the mud – in an increasingly complex set of manoeuvres like something out of the computer game Worm, where you end up going round in ever tighter circles until you run into your own tail.

But with a bit of perseverance, a bit of swearing, and some very muddy feet we managed to get out and about. Our first place of shelter was Barter Books. After we’d mistakenly followed Google into an industrial estate and turned around in Aldi then again in a carpet warehouse, we finally found our way into this warren of a secondhand bookshop in the impressive old station building at Alnick. We had a fantastic lunch in the ‘station buffet’ (I don’t know many station buffets that do thrice-cooked chips) and then the girls and Daddy went book shopping while Benjy and I sat by the fire . Caitlin was enthralled by the model railway running around at ceiling height, playing peekaboo between the bookshelves. And my husband bought himself a tea towel, so everyone was happy.

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Budding train drivers in Barter Books

On Day Three we discovered the delights of driving to a beautiful beach and sitting in a nice warm car with the radio on drinking coffee and eating brownies / licking an enormous lurid green ice cream with a flake in it (natch), according to taste, with big thanks to Benjy and Caitlin for falling asleep on the way and giving us an excuse for such behaviour. Eventually we braved the beach, and the winds, and despite Jackie’s initial uncertainty that her ears would stay attached to her head, we were rewarded with a simply breathtaking view and plenty of mud to play in.

Back in the shelter of the campsite we had half an hour or so before tea to indulge the girls in stalking some wildlife, and to indulge ourselves in the cuteness that is a toddler starting to speak in sentences. “Wabbits!” “Wheredawabbits?” “Wabbitshere!” “Wabbits!” “WabbitsHERE!” “Mama, WABBITSHERE!” … “Wabbitsgone…” sniff… “Wabbitsawgone”. Teatime girls. “No. NO. WudgafudgaWABBITS.”

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Stalking wabbits

On Day Four we were joined by an old friend and his daughter. Having as usual forgotten how ridiculously busy England can be on a sunny (if very breezy with a threat of rain later) weekend in the school holidays, we cheerfully set off for the picturesque village of Low-Newton-by-the-Sea. Selected by my husband on the grounds of its ‘wheelchair accessible nature trails,’ it was only when we passed a sign advertising The Ship Inn and Brewery that I realised the true reason we were visiting. Nonetheless it was a very picturesque village with a very picturesque pub serving very lovely food including some thoughtful children’s options. I slightly marred the picturesqueness for everyone else by changing Benjamin’s nappy on the village green, but you can hardly expect a cramped mediaeval pub at the end of a dead-end road on the Northumberland coast to have a Changing Place…

We did manage a stroll through the nature reserve, my husband and our friend taking the girls further along a rather less-than-accessible path to the beach whilst Benjy and I sheltered in a hide and did his physio. The hide was decorated with statistics of bird sightings and identification charts for everything from a wren to a golden eagle, but we managed a sum total of a solitary black-headed gull (everything else presumably still sheltering from Storm Brian).

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Really not into birdwatching

Storm Brian having finally passed, although I’m not sure exactly which portion of the wind and rain could be attributed to him, and left colder air in its wake, our final night in the tent was spent frantically trying to keep warm, and frantically checking that the sleeping children were warm enough, without cooling them down by opening their sleeping bags (not a problem for the girls because they always manage to kick their sleeping bags off anyway, much as they do our duvet when sharing our bed back home).

We gave up on our usual sophisticated evening routine of sitting in the dark drinking wine out of plastic mugs and eating salt and vinegar crisps, because the groundsheet was just too cold to sit on, and retired to our sleeping bags. Five minutes after my husband had fallen asleep next to his whisky, Caitlin awoke demanding milk. It was impossible to fit both her and me into my sleeping bag, so we spent the night squirming underneath it, with either my bottom or hers sticking out into the cold night air depending on which breast she was attached to. Suffice it to say, if that had been the first night and not the last, there would have been no nights two, three or four. But at least it justified the number of blankets and woolly hats I had packed.

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After a breakfast of instant noodles and leftover cake, our wonderful friend took the girls on an ‘adventure’ (i.e., another wabbit-hunt) to enable us to pack up (i.e., argue) in relative peace. If anyone has invented a method to remove all the contents from a tent, pack the tent up, and stow the tent in the bottom of the car boot underneath all the other contents, in the rain, without everything getting soaking wet in the process, please let me know. However, thanks to the fact that we are now experienced campers (having been twice this year), said watering of all our equipment was achieved in double-quick time and we even found room – and the good grace – to fit my husband in the car on the way home. As Bugs Bunny himself would say, “That’s all folks.” Until next year.

2 thoughts on “In the shadow of Storm Brian

  1. Love this, just reminded me of past holidays in Northumberland – have been to the bookshop and the Ship Inn that you mentioned. If you get chance to go back the gardens at Alnwick castle are fab and I seem to remember that the Treehouse there is wheelchair accessible too xx

    Like

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