The last thing I want is respite

My family are the best. Not the best behaved. Not the cleanest and tidiest. Not the most talented. Not even the best at getting on together. But all different and complementary, hilarious and frustrating in equal measures, we love each other to bits even when we’re fighting, and I cannot ever imagine life without any one of them.

But keeping a family, even the best family, going is hard work. Breastfeeding a fifteen month-old the size of a baby hippo is hard work. Stopping a five year-old from watching Paw Patrol all day is hard work. Doing an hour of chest physio every morning before the school run is hard work. Pushing a wheelchair with one hand and a five year-old on a bicycle with the other up a hill whilst carrying the aforementioned baby hippo on your front is hard work.

Half-sleeping with a video monitor three inches from your ear every night takes its toll. Keeping a running total of your earnings in your head each month so you don’t go over the limit and lose your carer’s allowance takes its toll. Writing letters to the council to try and get the support Benjamin needs to attend nursery takes its toll. Driving sixty miles a day to and from the hospital takes its toll.

So don’t get me wrong, I need respite. I know that we are incredibly fortunate to get respite and I am embarrassingly grateful for it. When Benjy is at respite we do things we can’t do when he is with us, like taking the girls to a birthday party at an inaccessible venue, like having a late night and a late lie the next morning. Like, er, hoovering the car out and washing all the covers on his chair. So we do access respite, and we appreciate it enormously, even if we do phone morning and night to see how Benjy is doing, and our family always feels like something is missing until he comes home.

We need respite, but when often I feel pulled in three, no four (don’t forget hubby), no five (I do have a job), maybe even six (can I include me?) different directions; when I want to be there for all my children but they are all in different parts of the county; when I just haven’t got enough arms for all the cuddles that are needed, the last thing I want is for someone to take one of my family off my hands. When my child is classed as ‘life-limited,’ and the time we have with him may be short, the last thing I want is respite.

What I want is a way to be with all my family, so that they are all safe, all their needs are met, and there is plenty of time for love and laughter and cuddles. So that I have two hands to hold them and not one taken up with a syringe or catheter. So that I have two ears to hear their stories and not one always listening out for a crisis.

That’s what Rachel House provides.

We are lucky enough to be here at the moment, on the shores of beautiful Loch Leven on the hottest weekend of the year. Last night I had a glass of wine with my husband under the stars while all three children slept. Yesterday we wandered around the farmer’s market, stroked some baby lambs, met friends for a picnic, a catch-up and an impromptu ice cream – Benjy included. In the evening we played with the girls in the garden while Benjy had a bath with underwater lights. This morning I had a massage and the girls and Daddy played with Benjy in the jacuzzi. Then we’ll all sit down to a proper Sunday lunch.

Rachel House is one of Scotland’s two children’s hospices, run by CHAS, Children’s Hospices Across Scotland. The wonderful staff provide top quality care for Benjamin: they do his meds, his feeds, his physio, …, all the boring stuff, but still let us join in the playtime, the goodnight kisses and the good morning cuddles. They free up the part of my brain that’s usually filled with when Benjy’s next medications are due, how much feed he’s had, whether his chest is sounding crackly and ‘is that just dystonia or is it a seizure?’ so that I can give the girls the whole of my attention for once (if they aren’t too busy painting with the activities team, dressing up in the playroom, or charging round the garden on bikes and diggers). And they provide top quality care for us, too, in the form of comfy beds, home-cooked meals and as much coffee and cake as we can manage.

Rachel House lets me give the girls some time, our marriage some time, even get some ‘me-time,’ without missing out on my Benjy smiles and Benjy cuddles. And Benjy smiles and Benjy cuddles are very frequent at Rachel House. So no matter how many of them the staff try to sneak, there’s always plenty left for us.

Rachel House gives us time, space and support to be a family. It lets us recharge so we function better as a family when we get home. It lets us relax as if we are part of their family. Respite has its place, but when the last thing you want is respite, Rachel House is the place to be.

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Obligatory cheesy family photo courtesy Katrina Lear Photography (http://katrinalearphotography.co.uk/)

**Today marks the last day of Children’s Hospice Week, organised by Together for Short Lives. This year the aim of the week is to turn up the volume on children’s palliative care, to raise awareness about the number and needs of children with life-limiting conditions and to celebrate all the lifeline services that children and families rely on; to amplify families’ voices and change people’s perceptions about some of the myths surrounding children’s palliative care. Our children’s hospice, Rachel House is run by Children’s Hospices Across Scotland. Find out how you can help CHAS here. Thank you**

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5 thoughts on “The last thing I want is respite

  1. I totally get this sometimes a place like this would be wonderful not just as a hospice but as a retreat respite centre for the whole family, Archie isn’t life limiting and I certainly enjoy my free time when he goes to his respite centre but would of loved something like how the hospice run in the early days, I think it would of helped with Archie having a better relationship with his brother and also might of kept the family together better, like you say sometimes it’s not respite from the child you have its just some respite from the routines so you can just be mum and not nurse and carer and just have fun. Great read thank you xx

    Like

      • That’s all it is for me I enjoy the breaks from the routines, the bad changes the medications, the ridged feeding times the sleepless nights etc, but not time away from him, I love my cuddle times the smiles the unconditional love he shows me and the fun times

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Pingback: We are the 57% | The long chain

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